The Origins of Rug Weaving

The origins of rug weaving dates back earliest to the 6000 B.C. as it replaced the animal skin and fur for floor coverings. The woven rug was exclusive to wealthy elite centuries ago; the industry was developed only a few centuries ago with Europe’s industrial revolution followed by other nations. The expensive commodity, as it was, is now a necessity of a common household. The history of carpet and rug production was dominated by Central Asia, especially Persia. The cities of Kashan and Kerman were the most renowned of them all that now constitute modern Iran. 

There are evidence of rug weaving from Central Asia to the South Asia and to the Chinese territory. An important discovery of a hand-woven pazyryk rug found in Mongolia in 1960 dates back to 464 B.C. it is evident from the fact that rug making art traveled from Central Asia to South Asia and then China as early as 500 B.C. In Europe, it was the ambitious European voyagers to the Middle East to introduce rugs and carpets to the shores of River Seine. Subsequently, Europe opened up to the Arab World after the Crusades that brought everything to Europe including the art of rug weaving. 

In India, Mughals were the first to cover their Palace floorings with the expensive wool and silk rug, it was adopted by Kashmiri craftsmen and is still being produced in the same quality and designs. After the Renaissance, everything changed, so were the methods of carpet weaving. Manual machines made it easier and faster to weave rugs that was further improved with the heavy industry being set up in England and then Europe and rest of the World. Once fantasized a luxury, rugs and carpets are common for floor coverings everywhere. The expensive wool and silk is replaced with synthetic fibers such as polypropylene, nylon, or polyester to meet the consumer needs. 

Rug Resources

2831 E Pacific Coast Hwy
Corona Del Mar
Phone: 9496731693
Email: Soroush@Rugresources.com
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The Difference Between a Rug & Carpet

Well, we all must have confused a rug with carpet or the other way around. There are popular debates on the internet on whether both the rugs and carpets be termed the same thing or not. It’s the same confusion as it is between a soccer and football, both are seemingly different yet incredibly the same. In some countries, there’s no difference at all, a few among them are conscious when calling it either a rug or a carpet. A somewhat acceptable argument is its defined area i.e. 40 square feet, above it is carpets and under the 40 sq. ft. are termed rugs. The word “Carpet” is originally traced back to an ancient French word “Carpite” that means a decorative cloth or a coarse cloth in English. Rug was used from 15th century onwards and is derived from Norse word “rogg” that means a mat. 

The primary technical difference among rugs and carpets are their size and applications. In the USA, anything spread wall-to-wall is a carpet, rugs are the tiny carpet pieces or entirely the separated products manufactured for specific usage i.e. wall hanging, foot or bedroom rugs. The rugs are loomed on a dedicated frame. Both rugs and carpets are made of the same materials, either the synthetic fibers or the naturally extracted wool, silk, cotton, or jute. Carpets are thicker and heavier than rugs, the carpets cover larger floor area with a defined border and design pattern in the middle. 

If you are buying a carpet, there are lesser options than it would be for rugs; the latter is pricey for its delicacy and hard work while being manufactured. When stained, rugs are easy to clean and dry compared to the carpets due to their mobility. Rugs are used for decoration, carpets are rugged and less embellished. 

Rug Resources

2831 E Pacific Coast Hwy
Corona Del Mar
Phone: 9496731693
Email: Soroush@Rugresources.com
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How is Child Labor Prevented in the Handmade Rug Industry?

The handmade carpet industry is plagued with dangerous activities and illegal dealings that is often too big for local policemen to tackle. These individuals usually threaten police as well with whatever power they have over them. It is for this reason that child labor is still a huge problem in countries where carpets are made. Children are forced to work ridiculous hours each day and they get very little money, if they get money at all. Their food rations are few and the conditions under which they work are horrible. 

Luckily there are many organizations that are willing to help and they do make a difference in these countries. The only downfall is that these organization are often self-funded and get very little money or support from governments in their countries. An example of a successful organization can be found in Pakistan and they are busy executing what is known as the ‘Combating Child Labor in the Carpeting Industry in Pakistan’ program. A number of manufacturers have joined this initiative to ensure that the world knows that they are against child labor in the workforce. 

The project has managed to help child workers escape the conditions of carpet weaving and several monitoring systems have been put in place to tend to the well-being of these children. They have partnered up with several other organizations and have erected different education centers where children are encouraged to go to school instead of go to work. These centers have already supplied non-formal education to 10,000 ex-carpet weaving children. 

Unfortunately these NGOs can only do so much without the necessary support. Recent findings have also shown that children choose to work in the loom factories instead of going to school. It has been reported that they often go in order to assist financially within their homes and that education is not regarded as a priority in the homes that they come from. However, this viewpoint is slowly starting to change as parents understand that education prepares their child for a better future. 

Rug Resources

2831 E Pacific Coast Hwy
Corona Del Mar
Phone: 9496731693
URL: